Monday, November 16, 2015

New Math?

So Adam is working on double digit addition (math is easy for that kid...he's totally going to be an engineer...he's a geeky loner who rocks at math...stereotypical engineer!).  And a lot of the tricks they are teaching him I don't disagree with...we learn to do mental arithmetic with them, but then I got this worksheet back.  Again I get the point of the tricks....but the kid can add.  So what if he doesn't rewrite it their way...now this looks like his teacher agrees with me, but still....

3 comments:

SK said...

My kid's math is heavy on tricks, also, including the one on the worksheet you scanned. He in so many words told me, "really? when I can figure it out just fine without having to re-engineer the problem?". Do they teach check numbers? Do you think these are a good idea? My thought - so much more work than just adding the numbers back together, but what do I know since I'm an old math user...

Jennie W said...

Yes, they do and I'm amazed at how much rewriting the kids do. I think we are probably doing about the same math as you. For Adam, it is easy, so getting him to take his time and write legibly is a major issue....

Now my grandfather, who has an eighth grade education, but is the smartest business man I know, knows all these tricks...and he can do arithmetic in his head that I can't even fathom...and I have a math degree! So maybe there is some logic to it...

What I did notice when they were first doing subtraction is that they were teaching it through addition fact...and it looks very much like algebra...just turn the blank into an x and it is algebra, solving equation. Now that I could get on board with....start them young!!

Christine said...

I can't stand "new math" at all. Teach mental tricks all day long - awesome! But first, teach the dang facts to mastery. So much of it was needlessly complicated with "fun math facts"... Can my kid/s do their math? Yes? Was their answer correct? Yes? Then let's move along. I have seen enough poor execution of spiral curriculums to choke a horse. I think some of this new math could be fantastic in the right hands, but it is nowhere I've seen universally applied that way. Throw in switching programs midstream and it's a hot mess. Our kids' school uses a traditional curriculum and I *puffy heart* not dealing with nonsense math and explaining "how" a kid who is still sounding out letter arrived at the solution to a simple addition problem.